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Jane Eyre Analysis - Essay

A+ Student Essay

❶Rochester all led her to the finding of family something she had always lacked but wanted, becoming wealthy, and being married to the one she longed for. Therefore, the strange coincidence of Jane ending up on the doorstep of Moor House should not be seen as a rupture in realism, but a thematic device.

by Charlotte Brontë

How does Jane save Rochester from the fire?
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Rochester already possessed a bride is ultimately exposed. Overwhelmed with emotions Jane is torn between her passion for Mr. Rochester and her own moral conscience. She comes to the conclusion that she must leave Thornfield at once.

Rochester with her plans to leave Thornfield and his passion quickly transforms into aggression. Rochester would lose respect for her and not desiring to be forced to live a sinful, degraded life as his mistress, slips away from Thornfield that very night. Although the thought of leaving her beloved Mr. Rochester wrenches at her heart her faith envelops her and pushes her onward. Leaving Thornfield with only a parcel which she accidentally forgets in the coach she is constrained to begging.

Jane, almost at the point of facing death, knocks on the Rivers door begging for a little food and some shelter for the night. Refused by the housekeeper Jane stands out in the rain when all of a sudden St. John returns to the house and overrules the housekeepers decision. Jane is giving a room for the night and promptly falls asleep. In a few days she recovers her full health and is approached with a job by St.

Sometime later she learns that the Rivers are in fact her cousins and is thrilled to learn that she indeed has a family when she had been told all her life she lacked one.

Along with the news of Jane being related to the Rivers she is also informed that her uncle, John Eyre of Madeira, has passed away and left her a wealthy inheritance. John continues to inform her that John Eyre had left an inheritance of twenty thousand pounds to her. John misunderstands her excitement of her uncles death and Jane explains to him how fortunate she is to receive a family and be able to repay kindness with kindness. John proposes the idea that Jane shall marry him and travel with him as his wife and helper.

She implies the thought that if she were to die over in India that St. John would not care since he did not hold true feelings of love for her. Disgusted with the thought St. John rejects her offer because of the concept of a thirty-year-old man traveling with an unmarried nineteen-year-old girl was unheard-of. On the morning of St. Finding Thornfield crumbled to ashes she returns to the a local inn where Mr.

Immediately Jane begins a chase offering her driver double the rate if he can deliver her to Ferndean before dark. John Rivers, her cousins. She lovingly prepares the house for their Christmas reunion and shares her inheritance with them.

Therefore, the strange coincidence of Jane ending up on the doorstep of Moor House should not be seen as a rupture in realism, but a thematic device. Finally, Jane returns to a more enlightened Rochester to start a true family. She rejects the qualitative judgments that society makes on the basis of class and recognizes her cousins for the shallow, self-indulgent children that they are.

She also balks at Mr. Jane seems most humiliated and angered when her integrity is in question. Although she ranks far below Rochester in social rank and wealth, a profound impediment to a marriage in the Victorian era, she feels equal to him in soul, understanding his true nature. Jane finds his courting of the frivolous Blanche Ingram for her political and social connections disturbing because she knows that she herself is more his intellectual and spiritual equal.

It is significant that the primary symbol of hypocritical societal propriety, Thornfield Hall, in which Rochester lives a sham life of decorum, must be destroyed by fire before he and Jane can live together happily and truthfully.

From the very beginning of the novel, the reader is struck by the sense of confidence and control in the narrative voice. At times, one is brought close to the narrator in an intimate relationship in which Jane makes the reader a confidant, revealing inner feelings and weaknesses. Yet she never allows herself complete vulnerability as a narrator.

Often Jane addresses readers directly, never letting them forget that she is aware of their presence.

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Jane Eyre literature essays are academic essays for citation. These papers were written primarily by students and provide critical analysis of Jane Eyre b Jane Eyre is a novel by Charlotte Brontë.

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- Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte In this essay I am going to analyse the novel ‘Jane Eyre’ by Charlotte Bronte. Jane is an orphaned child sent to live with her aunt and uncle. Her uncle was her last remaining blood relative and, since he died, she has been severely neglected.

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Belonging to a family is a major theme in Jane Eyre. Family was extremely important to a woman in the Victorian period. Family was extremely important to a woman in the Victorian period. It provided emotional and financial support to her as a child and an unmarried woman. A+ Student Essay. What does Jane Eyre have to say about social class? Does the book criticize or reinforce existing Victorian social prejudices? Victorian society was notoriously hierarchical and rigid, a fact that is amply explored in Jane Eyre. However, our titular heroine does not advocate for the dissolution of England’s rigid class system.

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Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte In this essay I am going to analyse the novel ‘Jane Eyre’ by Charlotte Bronte. Jane is an orphaned child sent to live with her aunt and uncle. Her uncle was her last remaining blood relative and, since he died, she has been severely neglected. Charlotte Bronte's novel, Jane Eyre, shows an enormous amount of relevance to the Victorian era while establishing the Victorian respect for high standards of Charlotte Bronte’s novel, Jane Eyre, shows an enormous amount of relevance to the Victorian era while establishing the Victorian respect for high standards of decorum and moral conduct.