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❶She wept at once, with sudden, wild abandonment, in her sister's arms.




Some of the themes brought have a different interpretation from what is normally known in the usual circumstances.

The themes of freedom and death have been projected quite in a way that gives a reader another understanding different from what is already known. Other themes that are evidently seen are time, freedom and confinement, marriage and emotional regression.

The title of the story also shows how so many things can happen within a single hour Wiggin and Nora In normal circumstances, death brings sorrow, grief, seclusion, guilt, regrets, amongst other feeling depending on the course of death.

In this story, death brings some of these feelings such as sorrow and grief. However, the story has proved that death can bring joy and independence. Kate Chopin uses death to symbolize joy and independence.

The story begins on a very sad note especially in the eyes of a reader. Upon the delivery of the news, she starts sobbing and grieving then goes to her room 3 to be by herself. This was a time to reflect upon her life.

The reality of a life without her husband slowly started setting in. As she is in her room, there is an overwhelming feeling that slowly builds up. Although she tries to conceal it, she can feel it within. It is the feeling of joy and happiness as to the new freedom she has found. During this time that she is in the room, she gets to think of the days that lay ahead of her. She even thinks of the funeral day. She knows that she will cry when she sees the cops of her husband but it seems as if it will crying induced by formality rather than feelings.

Death has come to liberate her from the marriage bondage. According to her, both men and women are victims of this bondage. Although she had some feelings of love for her husband, she tries to console herself that none of that mattered ant more and she would get a new kind of freedom. From the general look of things, it seems that this marriage was rather a sad rather than a happy marriage.

There are no children mentioned in the story, which makes one wonder if they really had intimate times. This may make a reader think that she is an old woman. However, she is young woman as one gets to know as the story continues. The lines of regression portray that she was in an unhappy marriage.

Her heart trouble at such an early age was also another sign that she was happy. This death would release her from all this unhappiness and usher her in to the world of independence, self-control and a new life. Although she does this in a holding back manner, she seems to be happy that she is finally free from a life that was belittling and oppressing. It is not until later, that we know that her first name is Louis.

Her last name became so part of her that she almost forget her real identity. Do not use very short and unconnected staccato sentences. It takes experience and practice to develop a sense of when a paragraph has been completed and when it a new one is needed.

The argument should develop through the language you use and therefore in a short essay sub-headings are unnecessary. Your essay will be the representation of an argument on a given subject or subjects. It will include only points which are relevant to the subject, so be careful to get rid of material that is not directly relevant. Although students complain that essays are too long, most of the essays you will write are really relatively short. Once the points have been chosen they should be presented logically and coherently, so do not leap about from point to point.

Each point generally will have some connection to the preceding one and the one to follow. After each draft of the essay check that each point is presented in a logical and coherent order. Read each draft carefully and critically. Is there a significant idea you have not included in the essay? Do you need to expand some of the points you have chosen to write about? Are some of the points, after due consideration, not really relevant? Have you been too long-winded or repetitive?

Does your argument need to be clearer, and do the links between some of the main points need more emphasis? You should be asking yourself these questions throughout. There are several clear things to say as far as advice for writing introductory paragraphs is concerned. They should not be very long, generally. An introduction should be no longer than a single paragraph.

You should be looking to write succinctly, and not pad out your essays with unnecessary and repetitive sentences. One reason that introductions should not be very long is that it is not really in your introductions that you will begin to analyse or interpret the text in question; instead you will tell the reader what you will look at in the main body of the essay.

Imagine yourself reading an article, newspaper column, etc. What do you want from the introduction? Normally, you would expect some strong reference to the main subject , theme or problem to be discussed, maybe some idea of what will be discussed on a secondary level, and some statement of how and why the various points arising will be discussed.

An essay is no different. Remember the advice in the guide to essay writing and elsewhere about the need for the first sentence of any paragraph to be a strong one. It is likely that in your first sentence you will want to make some reference to the main theme of the text you are discussing, or some reference to the plot. If so, then make sure that you refer to the most important and significant details - do not start with a reference to a secondary character, a minor detail or a sub-theme.

It can be useful, although not obligatory, to start with a one sentence summary of the whole story or poem, and this is something you can and should practice doing often. You could try this with a TV programme, a film or a news story that you have seen, heard or read. Practising one sentence summaries will help you to focus on what is absolutely essential. Although it can be absolutely essential and indispensable to use the language of the essay title or of the text you are working on, try to avoid doing this systematically.

Learn how to use dictionaries and a thesaurus, and expand your vocabulary. Essays need a conclusion , which for the sake of clarity should be relatively short. It is generally best not to include new ideas or new material in your concluding comments , particularly since many people think that a conclusion should be a summary of the prior arguments. You may, however, point to alternative conclusions or arguments, or briefly suggest areas of interest that have not been dealt with directly by the essay.

People often get the wrong idea about conclusions and believe that this is the place to state firm convictions, and that a conclusion has to make a stand and come down on the side of one argument or another.

This can be the case but it is not necessarily so. If an essay title comes in the form of a question, for example: It is as much a sign of intelligence to state that you cannot decide as it is to sift through the evidence and decide one way or the other. Think about why you cannot decide. Perhaps the evidence is conflicting.

Perhaps the literary text and its use of imagery is ambiguous, or even contradictory, as is often the case. If you cannot decide, then say so, outlining why you cannot decide. Alternatively, you may partly agree or partly disagree with the statements or questions raised by the title, or by questions raised directly in responding to the title. If so, say so. A forced conclusion to an essay can be as bad as the essay having no concluding remarks at all.

One way of looking at conclusions is to see them as a revised version of the introduction. It would be odd if there were significant differences between the two: This might also be a useful place to remind you that you may well change your introduction whilst you are working, as your arguments develop and you change your mind as far as the main issues are concerned.

Rewrite the following "magmatic" text into a coherent series of paragraphs, reflecting the different ideas expressed. Critical readings of Chopin's works often note the tension between female characters and the society that surrounds them. Margaret Bauer suggests that Chopin is concerned with exploring the "dynamic interrelation between women and men, women and patriarchy, even women and women" Often, critics focus on the importance of conflict in these works and the way in which Chopin uses gender constraints on two levels, to open an avenue for the discussion of feminine identity and, at the same time, to critique the patriarchal society that denies that identity.

Kay Butler suggests that "entrapment, not freedom, is the source of Chopin's inspiration, for she is primarily concerned with exploring the way in which gender roles deny identity"; she continues: Chopin's "The Story of an Hour" most poignantly balances the dual focus of her work, describing the incipient awakening of Mrs.

Mallard, and thus exploring the possibility of feminine identity, even while, ultimately, denying the fruition of such an experience. Like all of her works, this short story reacts to a specific historical framework, the Cult of True Womanhood, in its indictment of patriarchal culture. As Barbara Welter notes, in the nineteenth century, "a women judged herself and was judged by her husband, her neighbors, and society" by the attributes of a True Woman which included, especially, "purity" and "domesticity" The concept of purity, because it suggested that women must maintain their virtue, also, paradoxically, denied their status as emotional and affectionate beings.

Similarly, the concept of domesticity, because it relegated women to the home, denied their intellectual and professional capabilities Papke Mallard against the Cult of True Womanhood as she slowly becomes aware of her own desires and thus of a feminine self that has long been suppressed.

While this journey begins with the news of her husband's death, Mr. Mallard's unexpected return at the very end of the tale tragically cuts short the journey towards feminine selfhood. Yet the tale is tragic from beginning to end, for the very attempt to create an identity against the gender constraints of patriarchal society is riddled with a sense that such an attempt can only end in defeat. Mallard's journey towards selfhood only serves to reveal the erasure of identity, indeed of being, that women experienced in the nineteenth century.

Through symbolically and ironically suggesting that gender definitions delimit the feminine self, the opening of "The Story of an Hour" hints of the tragedy that pervades the tale. Mallard's "heart trouble," her sister and her husband's friend rush to her side to break the news of her husband's death in a gentle manner On a literal level, Louise Mallard's condition suggests that she has a congenital weakness that demands some care; Michelle Angeline suggests that this condition is "biologically fated" and thus that Chopin introduces the idea of biological determinism into the story Yet, on a more complex level, Chopin is demonstrating the way in which society perceives women, and wives in particular, as weak creatures who need to be handled very carefully, almost like children.

Ironically, on a deeper level, Chopin demonstrates symbolically the true nature of the problem: Ultimately, the fact that society fails to perceive the true nature of Louise Mallard's trouble, the lack of emotion and affection in her marriage and in her life, suggests that any attempt to create a self, in this tale, will only end in tragedy.

Indeed, Chopin demonstrates that Louise Mallard must react against the patriarchal society that constricts her to specific gender roles and confines her to certain behaviors if she is to define a self. Mallard's initial response to the news of her husband's tragic death suggests that this tale may not progress as expected: She wept at once, with sudden, wild abandonment, in her sister's arms.

When the storm of grief had spent itself she went away to her room alone. She would have no one follow her" Mallard's awakening in her resistance to traditional modes of behavior and suggests that if she is going to create a self, she will need to define her identity outside of the roles and codes that she has adhered to previously. Mallard retreats to her room, alone, she suspends "intelligent thought," leaving behind the codes that restrict her, and begins to contemplate the "open square" of window before her, exploring her new consciousness Mallard's conditioning within the Cult of True Womanhood has created a standard of behavior that fosters the suppression of her own unique desires and thus denies the creation of a self.

When the freedom that Louise Mallard sees out the open window finally reaches her, she does not know how to react: She did not know; it was too subtle and elusive to name.

But she felt it, creeping out of the sky, reaching toward her through the sounds, the scents, the color that filled the air" Louise Mallard's oppression, her lack of identity, ensures an inability to understand her experiences, a necessary precondition to creating a fully realized identity.

Nevertheless, the experiences are very real and very powerful: Mallard's resistance to the freedom that is approaching her is a result of her diminished condition, which is reflected in her powerless hands. Angeline notes that, "While freedom is an innate desire for all creatures, patriarchal society conditions women to suppress and to repress their desire for freedom, so much so that the possibility of freedom, when available, is frightening" In addition, as a significant aspect of the Cult of True Womanhood, the institution of marriage, which was founded on the objectification of women, leads to a denial of self and thus of feminine desires.

While Brently Mallard is likely a typical, kind husband, for he "had never looked save with love upon her" , Mrs. Mallard will only escape the confinement of the institution of marriage, and thus have an avenue opened for her own definition of self, in his death. Chopin decries the oppression of the institution of marriage in her dramatization of Mrs. Mallard's growing awareness of her freedom: There would be no powerful will bending hers in that blind persistence with which men and women believe they have a right to impose a private will upon a fellow-creature.

A kind intention or a cruel intention made the act seem no less a crime as she looked upon it in that brief moment of illumination"


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The Story of an Hour” by Kate Choplin Table of Contents Thesis Statement 3 Introduction 3 Analysis of Story 3 Synthesis and Evaluation of Emotions in Story 4 Conclusion 5 References 6 “The Story of an Hour” by Kate Choplin () Thesis Statement “The commandments of emotions are more powerful then powers of perceptions or rationale.

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Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of UK Essays. "The Story of an Hour" by Kate Chopin is a short story from the late nineteenth century focusing on a young woman as she reacts to a report that says her husband, on the top of the list of the report, had died in a train accident.

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“The Story of an Hour” Symbolism Essay In the short story, “The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin, the reader is introduced to an hour of a character’s life. Throughout the story there are many symbols to help the reader understand the emotions and changes of . “The story of an hour” is a short story written by Kate Chopin. According to Wikipedia, she was born Katherine O’Flaherty on February 8, , in St. Louis, Missouri.

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- Analysis of “The Story of an Hour” In her story “The Story of an Hour,” Kate Chopin () uses imagery and descriptive detail to contrast the rich possibilities for which Mrs. Mallard yearns, given the drab reality of her everyday life. The Story of an Hour, by Kate Chopin Essay - “The Story of an Hour” is a stark display of female rejection of the norms of society. This work, by Kate Chopin, begins with a woman going through the stages of grief for her husband’s death. For the wife, Louise Mallard, this was an awakening of a new life.